Throughout most of photographic history black and white images were the only option. Except for hand coloring techniques, there simply were no technologies for making color images. The means that were eventually developed proved dif-ficult, messy, and even dangerous by today's digital world standards. Black and white remained the default choice for traditional darkroom fine art photographers who developed elaborate procedures (the Zone System) to ensure the production of perfect negatives to make exquisite prints according to a well developed aesthetic.

The initial development of digital imaging reversed this. Both color image capture and color printing using profiles to ensure accuracy became relatively easy. Black and white printing, on the other hand, presented problems. As a result, black and white digital imaging bacame something of an oddity.

Current printers utilizing multiple monochrome inks of different value and the use of a variety of correction techniques have once again made black and white photography the medium of choice for many photographers.

Most of the black and white images here, whether originating with a film camera or a digital camera are available both as traditional silver gelatin prints and as inkjet prints.

China

China

Canada

Canada

Maine

Maine

Kentucky

Kentucky

Wisconsin

Wisconsin

Minnesota

Minnesota

Michigan

Michigan

Alaska

Alaska

Yellowstone

Yellowstone

Iceland

Iceland

Botanical Gardens

Botanical Gardens

Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania

Washington State

Washington State

New York State

New York State